How to get donations for schools

Anne-Marie’s recent single “2002” paints a picture of the days when we were young by referencing pop songs from when she was 11. And if you’re about 27, you might listen to “2002” and feel that the song takes you back to the days when you were singing at the top of your lungs with your childhood friends as well.

“Dancing in the Street” is not a Bowie/Jagger original. It’s actually a cover of a song that was originally performed by Martha and the Vandellas and was written by Marvin Gaye. This version, however, is without a doubt the most famous modern rendition and representation of the old song. (Fun fact: It was also covered by Van Halen shortly before Bowie and Jagger did it.)

On this day, 57 years ago, James Brown and his Famous Flames recorded what would become one of the most earth-shattering funk and soul albums of all time.

Music grants for nonprofits

Given that sample size, it’s almost impossible to narrow down “the best” without leaving something amazing out. This list simply represents a few of what we consider to be the most impressive, creative, and authentic covers out there in the entire “chipiverse.” Hopefully they inspire you to start creating chip covers of your own (and if you’re looking for a place to get started, check out our free course series, Chiptune Crash Course, and create a 60-second cover of Devo’s “Whip It” for the chance to win a modded Game Boy!).

+ Pursue your dreams faster with a Soundfly Mentor! Share your musical goals with us and we’ll pair you up with a professional musician, engineer, educator, or music industry veteran who will help you achieve them in a customized four-week session.

Although this list is technically geared towards kids… adults, do not be shy about confessing your love of these books! I’m actually prepping my Amazon cart with a few of these myself. And, more importantly, for those DIY touring musicians out there — not that we know how popular these books are — why not consider making one of these books yourself for your merch table? (Just a thought…)

Self-described as “an inventory of cross-disciplinary interestingness, spanning art, science, design, history, philosophy, and more,” Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings explores many different genres and ideas with multiple sources that can help you find something to be inspired by. Typically their posts will start with a quote, or a literary thought experiment, and dive deep into the stories or moments that inspired them.

Join the Headliners Club and take a giant musical leap forward in one month with a Soundfly Mentor. It’s like having a personal trainer for your music, with a series of musical workouts, a whole lot of feedback and support, and the chance to accomplish something you’ll be proud of. Click here to tell us more about your musical goals. We’d love to help you reach them! 

Drumline grants

The same goes for children of the ’80s, ’70s, ’60s, and so on. If you’re writing in a context targeted for baby boomers, why not borrow the triplets and I-vi-IV-V chord progression from the 1954 doo-wop song “Earth Angel”?

In Soundfly’s new course, The Art of Hip-Hop Production, you’ll learn the nuances of producing beats, arranging tracks, and creative sampling techniques.

Program fees: Housing is included, usually located just outside the parks for easy access, and most will come with a $2,000 stipend. Artists are responsible for their own travel, supplies, and food. The cost to apply is between $55 and $150.

The Shure SM7b is a classic broadcast microphone. Used in radio stations all over the world, this large diaphragm dynamic microphone is known for its smooth, warm sound. With built-in tone controls, the SM7b lets you fine-tune the sound of your voice right at the source. An internal shock mount and pop filter prevent mechanical noise as well as plosives. And the built-in swivel mount makes finding the perfect mic placement a breeze.

You’re also going to need a delay, one way or the other. When it comes to delay pedals, there is analog modulation and digital modulation. Many people automatically point to analog delays to say they are better than digital, but it’s always a question of taste, and most guitarists out there exploring expansive sound palettes will have both on their board. Analog delays sound more like a tape machine; their echoing tone changes the pitch a bit up or down and it’s darker fading out then a digital delay. The latter sounds more like an exact copy of the inserted signal that fades away. If you are a guitarist who likes to tap the delay time with your feet, this will affect your pedal choice as well.